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Kirill Poletkin

Dr. Kirill Poletkin

Spin & Photon Applications Laboratory
Phone: +49 721 608-29305
kirill poletkinKsp8∂kit edu

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Institute of Microstructure Technology
Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1
76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen


My research interest is focused on Micro- and Nano- machined Systems, and processes of energy transport in these systems. I am interested in employing the levitation phenomena and unique energy properties of such systems to improve their performances in various current applications and create conceptually new ones for micro-sensors and -actuators, and fundamental science.

Kirill Poletkin received the diploma (Hons.) of electromechanical engineer majoring in Aviation devices and measuring computing complexes in 2001 from Arzamas branch of Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University and the Ph.D. degree from Moscow Aviation Institute (State University of Aerospace Technologies), Russia in 2007.

Currently, he is a postdoc in Institute of Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology.

He was previously with the Laboratory for Microactuators, Department of Microsystems Engineering - IMTEK, University of Freiburg, he had performed his Humboldt project titled as “Micromachined contactless suspension with zero spring constant for application as an accelerometer”. Before he was with Nanyang Technological University, Giesecke & Devrient GmbH (G&D), JSC Temp-Avia, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (VNIITF).

Activities:

As a result of shrinking size the sensitivity of a micro-sensor is dramatically decreased due to the scaling effect and the domination of the friction over inertial forces in the micro-world. In turn, these facts also limit the performance of a micro-actuator. An indisputable solution is levitation, which eliminates completely mechanical attachment, consequently friction, between stationary and moving parts of these micro-devices. Employing levitation adds considerably freedom of movement to micro-devices, which cannot be achieved by mechanically suspended devices.